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Full Tilt Poker Can’t Say Anything But Has Plenty To Say (When It Suits Them)

Over the last couple of months since Black Friday Full Tilt has repeatedly stated that they can’t say anything due to the DOJ indictments. I partially addressed how odd this sounds in my post Full Tilt’s Money Woes. Full Tilt is acting like they have a gag order in place but none has been announced. Neither the company or the pros seems to want to make any public statements about the lack of communication pertaining to the return of player funds.

And while they acknowledge that this is causing harm to their brand they still aren’t answering any direct questions. As I mentioned in the Money Woes post there simply isn’t a legal reason for this. And I think Full Tilt has proven how BS this excuse is with their response to the Ivey lawsuit (also mentioned in the Money Woes post).


“Contrary to his sanctimonious public statements, Phil Ivey’s meritless lawsuit is about helping just one player – himself. In an effort to further enrich himself at the expense of others, Mr. Ivey appears to have timed his lawsuit to thwart pending deals with several parties that would put money back in players’ pockets. In fact, Mr. Ivey has been invited — and has declined — to take actions that could assist the company in these efforts, including paying back a large sum of money he owes the site. Tiltware doubts Mr. Ivey’s frivolous and self-serving lawsuit will ever get to court. But if it does, the company looks forward to presenting facts demonstrating that Mr. Ivey is putting his own narrow financial interests ahead of the players he professes to help.”

This was released roughly 24 hours after Ivey posted it on his website. Wait . . . they can write this highly provocative response to Phil Ivey in 24 hours but they can’t answer simple questions about where hundreds of millions of dollars are?

This says a lot. One of the reasons this brief statement says so much is because they discuss the fact that Ivey’s actions are possibly holding up paying back players. Whether the accusations is true or not is irrelevant. What is important is that it seems FTP can discuss paying back customers when it suits them. When players were making many of the same accusations that Ivey did the company had little to say claiming that their lawyers were preventing them from discussing it. Phil Ivey makes an accusation and suddenly it’s okay to talk about paying back customers.

Likewise, FTP has been leaking information to eGaming Review about the status of seized funds (or in this case frozen but not seized) while at the same time claiming that they can’t say too much because of the indictment.

So which is it? Can they talk or can’t they?

3 comments

  1. this is common reaction to companies who have lawsuit on their shoulders inorder for them not to make more public mistakes they just shut up and dont tell the full details of the problem especially when it comes to money..they just say blah blah and wait for further details..and it takes time for them to refund but not all gambling companies are like this.

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  2. Pretty unbelievable how they’ve handled all this. Communication or customer support was never really their strong suit but that PR response to Ivey is in its own league of fail. It reads more like a nasty Facebook message a 16 year old girl would post to get back at some guy, just with bigger, grander-sounding words inserted.

    I just don’t understand why they caved so quickly or what they think they hope to gain by meekly and quietly bending a knee. It’s not like the DoJ is going to say: “You know, you guys were good; here’s a cookie now go off and play.”

    If they think they’re going to be offered the same chance Party was to pay a big fine and do their penance (and possibly be allowed in the future to legally re-enter the US market if/when the laws change) they’re absolutely fucking nuts.

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